Source for low profile IDE connector

Topics on hardware and modifications. Please post your "how to" steps that involve tools here.

Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Wed May 04, 2011 8:36 am

For those of you with a steady soldering iron...

I have located a source for the low profile female connector used on the IDE flash modules.

http://www.samtec.com/ProductInformation/TechnicalSpecifications/Overview.aspx?series=CLT
I believe that part number CLT-122-02-G-D will be a good substitute.  They take credit cards and will sell small quantities. Price is about $4 in single quantity. I have samples on the way.

It should be fairly simple to replace this connector. Removing the old one is the most difficult part. I suggest cutting away the plastic body of the connector and desoldering the pins individually. Clean up the pads with solder wick, re-tin, re-install, check for bridges.

DAM
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Tue May 10, 2011 1:57 pm

My sample connector has not yet arrived, but I have an update on the removal of the old connector. I had a similar 64 MB flash module laying around from an HP thin client, so I decided to practice removing the connector. The "Divide and conquer" method was fairly successful. I cut the connector into small sections with a pair of diagonal cutters before attempting to de-solder it. This worked quite well for the most part, but resulted in a few lifted pads where I used a bit too much force on the cutter. I think the pads were lifted before I started desoldering. For the most part, the connector legs came off very nicely, since they were able to move individually. I will look for another 64MB module and try other ways of cutting up the connector. A hack saw comes to mind...
DAM
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Tue May 17, 2011 9:01 pm

My connectors have arrived from Samtec, and I have succeeded in modifying a flash module. I used a 512 module from an HP thin client. My goal was to have additional modules, so I could work on several system builds at one time, so 512 is plenty of room. I made two hacksaw cuts, one through each line of contacts. I cut right through the contacts from the top of the connector, and down to near the bottom of the plastic. When I was done, I was able to split the remaining plastic away from the contacts, leaving each one ready for individual desoldering. I had to be careful to avoid breaking the contacts at the end of the rows with the saw.  I cleaned up the solder pads, re-tinned, and then installed the new connector. It works fine, after I found two "bad" solder joints... I completed the modification by removing the master/slave jumpers and permanently wiring the master connection.

Time, about 1.5 hours. I did ruin several 64M modules while developing the technique, so practice on something expendable...

DAM
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby volkswagner » Wed May 18, 2011 6:36 am

Can you post some pics?

I think you may be able to find folks here willing to sell their 512chips to you, since some have upgraded to 4Gig chips.  You may want to put a call out (request).
Nothing is ever easy, but if it is difficult you must be doing it wrong.
My Wife's invention Doll Carrier
volkswagner
Administrator
Administrator
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:27 am
Location: NewYork's 1st Capitol

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Sun May 22, 2011 12:14 pm

I did take some pictures, but I don't have them with me. I will post shortly. Thanks for the suggestion on larger modules, but I think I am OK for the moment. I have several additional modules to convert.

By the way, this conversion results in a module that fits correctly in the system. I have previously tried the "shaved" connector modification, but found that the converted module was not a good fit, resulting in the rear cover binding on the converted module. This shows up as a pressure point on the display, resulting in "white blooming" on the LCD around the pressure point. I also think the shaved module is a problem in the 368, as it interferes with the heat pipe spacing on the rear cover, which could cause overheating.

It should work on any size module, so those of you that have upgraded to 4Gig modules, or have ruined modules in the "shaving" process, should be able to achieve a good fit in your systems.

DAM
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Mon May 23, 2011 10:23 pm

Attached is a photo of the memory module with the low profile connector on the left. I cut through the old connector with a hacksaw. this let me peel the plastic away and desolder one contact at a time.
With one side loose, I was able to bend the other side back and forth until the contacts broke. Then I was able to desolder the remains of the contacts.

I am using this module in a dt368 to post this.

DAM
Attachments
HPIM5944b.JPG
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:37 am

I have found a better way to desolder the old connector. You can use an industrial heat gun, the kind that looks like a hair dryer, but is MUCH hotter. They sell these in the hardware store as paint removers. I maksed off all of the components on the board with high voltage electrical tape. (The thick kind made of natural rubber. You could probably use some other heat resistant tape) This is important to keep from desoldering anything else... I held the module in a vise, and applied heat to the connector from above. (The same direction that the mating pins enter from...) About 20 seconds of heat was enough to reflow all the solder on the connector, from there it is a simple thing to poke the connector with a screwdriver, and knock it off the board. Your connector may have some alignment bumps that go into holes in the board, so you may have to push at an angle to get it loose. Make sure you don't use much force at all. If you do, you might lift up some of the PCB pads with the connector... That would be bad. I have done several boards this way with good results.
This technique might also be useful for fixing cracked solder joints on BGA components... I have a 368 with a bad connection somewhere, so I might get to try it out. I would consider that use fairly high risk though...

DAM
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am

Re: Source for low profile IDE connector

Postby damwashere » Tue Jun 28, 2011 11:27 am

Just FYI, I have used the hot air method on several modules now, with good results.

DAM
damwashere
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:49 am


Return to Specifications / Hardware

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron

x